Getting Started as a Grant Professional

If I've learned anything from my decade in the grants & fundraising world, it's that experience is the best teacher. My first job out of graduate school was as a Grant Writer, and the day I started in my role two things happened: My new supervisor (the agency's Director of Development) told me that my first assignment would be to complete and mail out two LOI's to foundations during that week, and also...she was putting in her two week's notice that day. My shock was likely palpable, and it was pretty evenly split at hearing both of these things. I had no idea what an LOI was, so I fervently googled around until I learned it was a Letter of Inquiry/Letter of Interest, and found a few articles and templates that at least set me on the path to completing my first task. My searches for "what to do when your boss quits on your first day" led to far less concrete guidance. 

I now have thousands of LOI's, proposals, rejections, grant reviews, hours of mentoring, and years of teaching grant writing skills under my belt as a development professional; and am often asked how to get started in this field. There are a few pieces of advice I give, as well as interesting (hopefully useful) things I've learned through my experience: 

  • You can read all the books, listen to the podcasts, take courses, go to workshops, and take part in a whole host of other learning activities to understand how to do this work (my list of recommended resources can be found here), but nothing is as valuable as getting in there and trying it for yourself. Throughout my career, I've rarely known exactly what I was getting into with specific funding agencies, applications, etc., but I've found that diving in and just doing it has led to a greater confidence in simply figuring it out, along with valuable development as a fundraising professional, and deeper knowledge of the nuances of this work. 
  • There's no magic formula. Anyone who tells you there is--is lying (and is probably trying to rip you off as well). Even when you're doing a great job--clear, concise, brief, powerful storytelling combined with rich, impactful data--your work is only 50% of the equation when funders are looking for a match. Speaking of which...
  • Rejection is a huge part of this work. The MAJORITY of grant proposals written are not funded, and cultivating a successful partnership with funders takes a significant investment of time and effort. As a development professional, you must learn to understand this, and take rejection as an opportunity to glean valuable information, as well as deepen your organization's relationship with a funder. 
  • Cultivation is also a huge part of this work. Identifying a match between your organization and potential funders is critical. Developing a relationship over time that is mutually beneficial is critical. Funding is not a one-way relationship, and the sooner you understand that as a development professional, the sooner you'll see success. Stewarding funders is vitally important. Growing a relationship with supporters over time is the lifeblood of most organizations, as it leads to stable funding (of course, this is relative in the nonprofit world!) and hopefully, increased giving. 
  • Gratitude is the single most important quality to possess and to put forward in your relationships with supporters. Say thank you, sincerely, as often as you can.
  • This work is not rocket science. It is not nearly as difficult to do successfully as people believe it is--grant writing is seriously not that hard! Follow instructions. Put yourself in the shoes of your potential funders as much as possible, everything you do should be to make their lives easier. Make their jobs less work, and you'll see greater success. 
  • Asking questions, not knowing everything, needing time and information to put things together...all of this is okay, and moreover, makes you a better development professional.  Be curious, ask for information, clarify when you don't know the answers. This applies both to relationships with funders as well as those within your organization. 
  • Nonprofit sustainability is a myth. Vu Le of Nonprofit AF has written eloquently and extensively on this topic, so I'll just link some of his amazing posts on the subject here, here, here, and here
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