Nonprofit Myths...a multi-part series!

I recently sat down with some outstanding fundraising & nonprofit management colleagues (who also happen to be kind and wonderful people and good friends) to discuss an upcoming presentation we’ll be giving to a group of local business and community leaders. Very quickly, as it often does when in the company of kindred spirits and trusted colleagues, our conversation turned to the common frustrations we have with the various myths and misunderstandings we encounter as nonprofit professionals. We have each tried to counteract these as much as we can in our respective spheres, and I applaud the work that Stacey, Andy, and Clay do to fight the good fight for our sector through their endeavors: the Nonprofit Everything podcast, Annual Fund Lab blog, Valor CSR, Professionals in Philanthropy. Stacey and Clay are on Twitter too, dispensing oodles of fundraising wisdom!

As the four of us chatted, we collectively created a list of more than a dozen irritating, harmful, and downright absurd myths and misconceptions that we encounter frequently in our work. Often, these questions are posed by folks who aren’t intimately familiar with the nonprofit/public sector, or who haven’t been in/around the work long enough to understand some of these challenges. Many who ask these questions genuinely don’t know the reasons why these issues are irritants to those of us who spend our entire lives in this work, and they mean no harm or disrespect—it’s often simply a lack of exposure.

So, over the next several weeks, I’ll be tackling the issues on our collective list, starting with myth number one: Nonprofits need goods/services or time & talent from board members, volunteers, and the broad community more than anything.

I’ll start with the aspects of this myth that are accurate: Many nonprofit organizations lack deep capacity in certain operational and/or other specialized professional services areas…this is true. Nonprofits recruit board members that have specialized skill sets, professional connections, and access points that they would otherwise not have access to, due to limited or restricted funding, and lean operations. Many nonprofit organizations seek to place individuals on their boards and committees that have the ability to bring goods and services to the table (donated, at-cost, or discounted) for the benefit of the organization. Likewise, nonprofit organizations may seek the involvement and professional skills from people in various fields to supplement their operations or other functions: for example, many nonprofits seek to have attorneys serving on their boards, to have the option of accessing or obtaining legal advice should that be needed.

Here’s where this issue becomes an irritant for nonprofits: Those that are tapped for board, committee or volunteer service with an organization often see that as the only contribution they can or should make, or that the goods/services they are donating are all that the organization may need. The hard truth: For nonprofit organizations, the best thing to receive as a donation is cash. Dollars. Unrestricted funding. Moolah. Bucks. Money. While it is valuable, necessary, and even vital for many organizations to receive donated goods/services, the almighty dollar is the highest value donation, and the unrestricted dollar is the gold star ultimate donation.

It’s easier for many board members who are volunteering their time and are likely not fundraisers by profession to ask for goods/services to be donated. It’s easier not to have to make a direct ask for financial donations. However, that does a disservice to nonprofit organizations that are almost always in need of additional financial support. As a volunteer, how can you counteract this? ASK the organization their needs. Ask them to prioritize their requests. There are need to have’s, and nice to have’s, and “oh god, now we have this thing we have to deal with” on the nonprofit side. Make sure you are assessing whether your gift of goods/services is truly beneficial for the organization, and whether it creates additional burden for an organization to administer, manage, or otherwise address. Also, give cash whenever you can :)

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